Anti-Arc standard for flame retardant fabrics

- Jul 29, 2019-

          The following is a brief description of the minimum performance specifications affecting industrial fire protective clothing. Each standard specification uses a test method to verify performance and defines the lowest or highest test performance parameters for each test that meets the criteria.


1 ASTM F1506-94 Standard performance specifications for textile materials used in protective clothing worn by electrical workers exposed to transient arcs and related thermal hazards


2 ASTM F1891-98 Standard Specification for Arc Protection and Fireproofing Clothing


3 NFPA 70E Employee Workplace Electrical Safety Requirements Standard 2000 Edition

 

Standard performance specifications for textile materials used in protective clothing worn by electrical workers exposed to transient arcs and related thermal hazards


This specification provides performance requirements for protective clothing worn by electric workers and others working near the electrified area. Unless otherwise required by the heat, the fabric is also required to have a crease-free and non-ironing fabric fire resistance; that is, the fabric does not continue to burn after the fabric does not ignite or leave the ignition source. Fire resistance was measured using FTM 5903.1 "Vertical Flame Test" (continuation of flame for up to 2 seconds and charring length of up to 6 inches). The standard is currently being revised and will include requirements for reporting arc levels. The arc rating is an arc thermal protection performance value (ATPV) or an arc breaking value (EBT) as determined according to ASTM F1959 "Thermal Protection Performance Test".


ASTM F1891 Standard Specification for Arc Protection and Fire Resistant Waterproof Clothing

This standard applies to refractory waterproof materials used in raincoats. Coated or laminated fabrics can be used to make garments. The fabric must be fire resistant as determined by ASTM D-6413 "Vertical Flame Test" (continuation of flame for up to 2 seconds and charring length of up to 6 inches). The standard also requires reporting of Arc Thermal Protection Performance Value (ATPV) and requires a minimum arc breaking threshold (EBT) of 5 as determined by ASTM F1959 "Thermodynamic Characteristics Test". The standard is currently being revised and will include fabric flammability tests that are more suitable for coated fabrics.


NFPA 70E Employee Workplace Electrical Safety Requirements Standard 2000 Edition

The electrical hazard threats present in the workplace are described in NFPA 70E. NFPA 70E requires the employer to document the worker's prone to live contact when it has been determined that the worker will be operating within the breakdown protection boundary.


The NFPA defines the legally charged contact level based on the distance between the face and chest and the potential arc source when the worker is engaged in a particular job. Workers use anti-static cloth refractory protective clothing and personal protective equipment, according to the specific working level of electrical contact, you need to wear adequate protection level equipment.

Work involved in 70E Work not covered in 70E


1 Installation of conductive materials and other electrical equipment in industrial substations, residential or commercial buildings

2 Connecting equipment and power supply

3 Install other outdoor conductive material anti-static fabrics? Install equipment on ships, boats, railway vehicles, airplanes, or cars other than RVs and RVs.

4 Installation equipment in underground mines

5 Installation of equipment for vehicle operation on railways

6 Communication equipment installation under common control

7 Installation equipment under power control

 

Category NFPA 70E Requirements

Movement and visibility When employees wear refractory, flame-retardant or treated protective clothing, the protective clothing will cover all combustible clothing, the wearer can move and visibility is good.

Body protection • Workers should wear refractory protective clothing wherever they may be exposed to arc flames.

These protective suits can be made into shirts and trousers, or overalls, or one-piece jackets and trousers, or jumpsuits and jackets for maximum protection.

The outer layer is also required to wear refractory materials such as jackets and waterproof garments that are worn outside the FR clothing.

The bottom layer of the underlying fabric (underwear) should be avoided to be fused into fibers. The underlying clothing that does not catch fire and does not melt and drip during exposure to arcing and related thermal hazards provides additional protection.

Coverage Protective clothing should cover as much as possible the area with potential exposure.

Nursing and maintenance

1 All personal protective equipment should be maintained under hygienic and credible conditions.

2 Usually personal protective equipment is used in conjunction with personal protective equipment as a system to provide adequate protection.

3 FR and natural fiber clothing can be used in a layered system for additional protection.

4 A typical tiered system can include a sweatshirt, a shirt and trousers, and a one-piece protective suit.

5 Special protective equipment can be used for specific jobs.


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